b
home
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator
  • JoomlaWorks Simple Image Rotator


 

Sponsors: Lyons Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, First Commerce Bank, Ok Tire and Brake, Blalock Plumbing & Electric

Sponsors: Roberts Toyota, First Commerce Bank, Lyons Chevrolet, Buick, and GMC, Michael Wealth Management, Pizza Hut

Sponsors: First Commerce Bank, Griffin Cook & Sons, First National Bank, Lyons Chevrolet, Buick, and GMC, Michael Wealth Management, H&S Pharmacy, Blalock Plumbing and Heating, TriStar Training

Sponsors: First Commerce Bank, Ledford Employee Exchange, H&S Pharmacy, John Karby - Edward Jones Investments, TnWeb, Meredith Warner Animal Clinic

MCCOC

Safety Belt And Sobriety Roadside Safety Checkpoints in Marshall County For June 29th

The Tennessee Highway Patrol will be conducting safety belt and sobriety roadside checkpoints during the week of June 24th in Marshall County. The Safety Belt Checkpoint will be on State Route 50 at the 2 mile marker beginning at 7:00 p.m. The Sobriety Roadside Checkpoint will be set up on State Route 50 at the 0 mile marker beginning at 10 p.m.

Recognizing the danger to unbelted vehicle occupants, Troopers will target those who operate a vehicle while unbelted and take corrective actions for other violations observed.

Impaired driving is a serious crime that kills more than 16,000 people and injures 305,000 people every year in the U.S. troopers will evaluate drivers for signs of alcohol or drug impairment. Troopers will target those who operate a vehicle while impaired and take corrective actions for other violations observed while ensuring the protection of all motorists.

The THP recognizes that these checkpoints are highly visible and effective tools in the battle against impaired driving and enforcing the safety belt laws.

 
Offices To Close For The 2016 July 4th Holiday

1. THE MARSHALL COUNTY BOARD OF PUBLIC UTILITIES AT 624 WEST COMMERCE STREET, LEWISBURG WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY, JULY 4, 2016, IN OBSERVANCE OF FOURTH OF JULY HOLIDAY.  WE WILL REOPEN TUESDAY, JULY 5TH AT 8:00 AM.

2. The office of Town Hall in Cornersville will be closed on Monday July 4th in observance of Independence Day. The office will re-open on Tuesday July 5th at the

regular hour of 7:30 am.

 
No Open Burning in Lewisburg Effective Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Due to the very dry conditions in Lewisburg, Lewisburg Fire Department Chief, Larry Williams, has implemented a ban on all open burning in Lewisburg. This ban will remain until conditions a favorable again. For more information on this burn ban call the Lewisburg Fire Department at 359-4544.

 
Marshall County Board of Education Meetings July 2016

1. The Marshall County Board of Education Policy Committee will meet Thursday, July 7, 2016 at 5;00 p.m. in the central Office, 700 Jones Circle.

 
Local Ham Radio Operators Take Part in National Drill

This weekend, members of the Marshall County Amateur Radio Society will participate in the annual “Field Day” drill, sponsored by A-R-R-L – The National Association for Amateur Radio.  They’ll join over 35,000 “ham” radio operators in the United States and Canada setting up and operating radios and antennas under simulated emergency conditions.  The station will be in operation from 1:00 PM Saturday through 1:00 PM Sunday behind the Hardison Office Annex on College Street in Lewisburg and the public is invited to visit.

The event is a test of operating, technical, and problem-solving skills.  The club will largely be using equipment owned by Marshall County and purchased through grants from the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and the US Department of Homeland Security as well as some “home brewed” equipment and antennas.

 

 
Town of Cornersville Meetings July 2016

The Town of Cornersville will have its regular meeting of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen on July 7, 2016 at 6:30 P.M. at Town Hall in Cornersville. This meeting is open to the public and all citizens are welcome to attend.

 

 
Safety Belt And Sobriety Roadside Safety Checkpoints in Marshall County For June 24th

The Tennessee Highway Patrol will be conducting safety belt and sobriety roadside checkpoints during the week of June 24th in Marshall County. The Safety Belt Checkpoint will be on State Route 50 at the 2 mile marker beginning at 7:00 p.m. The Sobriety Roadside Checkpoint will be set up on State Route 99 0.2 miles west of the 2 mile marker beginning at 11 p.m.

Recognizing the danger to unbelted vehicle occupants, Troopers will target those who operate a vehicle while unbelted and take corrective actions for other violations observed.

Impaired driving is a serious crime that kills more than 16,000 people and injures 305,000 people every year in the U.S. troopers will evaluate drivers for signs of alcohol or drug impairment. Troopers will target those who operate a vehicle while impaired and take corrective actions for other violations observed while ensuring the protection of all motorists.

The THP recognizes that these checkpoints are highly visible and effective tools in the battle against impaired driving and enforcing the safety belt laws.

 
Support the Local Radio Freedom Act

The big record labels have seen album sales, and their revenue, decline as more listeners opt for digital downloads. So now, they are urging Congress to impose a fee, which many consider a tax, on local radio stations simply for airing music free of charge for listeners.

Ironically, local radio remains the number one promotional vehicle for music – and already provides between $1.5 to $2.4 billion dollars annually in music sales for artists and record labels. By pushing a fee on local radio, record labels are biting the hand that feeds them.

WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO YOU ASK?

In short, the money would flow out of your community and into the pockets of the record labels – the great majority of which are foreign-owned. The record labels would like for you to think this is all about compensating the artists, but in truth the record labels would get at least 50 percent of the proceeds from a fee imposed on local radio.

HOW DOES THIS AFFECT YOU?

If you’re one of the nearly 243 million people who listen to radio each week, this fee could reduce the variety of music radio stations play, and all but eliminate the possibility of new artists breaking onto the scene. It could particularly affect smaller, minority-owned stations, some of which may have to switch to a talk-only format like WJJM AM Fox Sports Talk or shut down entirely.

IT ALSO AFFECTS YOUR COMMUNITY.

Radio stations are major contributors to public service – generating $6 billion in public service annually and providing vital news and community information and free airtime to help local charities. If a tax were imposed, stations’ critical public and community service efforts could be reduced. And worst of all, the jobs of 106,000 Americans employed by local radio could be in jeopardy.

DOESN’T RADIO ALREADY PAY FOR MUSIC YOU ASK?

Radio compensates composers and songwriters to the tune of about $550 million annually. It’s widely understood that songwriters do not have the same name recognition to financially exploit themselves to make money. Performers can make money from touring and personal appearances, merchandise and other licensing and branding opportunities like perfume and clothing lines.

Radio stations also pay a royalty for streaming music over the internet, for reasons that include concerns that a digital copy of the music could be captured by the end user.

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP LOCAL RADIO STATIONS LIKE WJJM FM?

Congress has continually recognized that local radio is different and should not be subject to such a fee. Local radio is free, so everyone, regardless of income, can have access to it. The Local Radio Freedom Act has been introduced in Congress to oppose a tax on local radio stations. Visit NoPerformanceTax.org to take action and encourage your senators and representatives to cosponsor this legislation.

noperformancetax.

 
Tennessee Unemployment Rate For May 2016 Is 4.1%

Tennessee Labor & Workforce Development Commissioner Burns Phillips announced Thursday, June 16th, the Tennessee preliminary unemployment rate for May was 4.1 percent, two-tenths of a percentage point decrease from the April revised rate of 4.3 percent. The U.S. preliminary rate for May was 4.7 percent, down three-tenths of a percentage point from the previous month.

Economic Summary

 

 

  • Over the past year, Tennessee's unemployment rate decreased from 5.8 percent to 4.1 percent while the national rate declined from 5.5 percent to 4.7 percent.

 

  • Total nonfarm employment decreased 13,400 jobs from April to May. The largest decreases occurred in government, leisure/hospitality, & professional/business services.

 

 

Over the year, nonfarm employment increased 60,900 jobs. The largest increases occurred in education/health services, trade/transportation/utilities, & manufacturing.

 
Marshall County Board of Education Meetings June 2016

1. The Marshall County Board of Education will meet on Monday, June 13th at 6 p.m. in the Board Conference Room at Jones Circle.

 
State Of Tennessee Revenue Report May 2016

Tennessee tax revenues exceeded budgeted estimates in May, driven primarily by sales taxes. Department of Finance and Administration Commissioner Larry Martin announced Friday that overall May revenues were $1.0 billion, which is $41.3 million more than the state budgeted.
On an accrual basis, May is the tenth month in the 2015-2016 fiscal year.

General fund revenues were more than the budgeted estimates in the amount of $37.4 million while the four other funds that share in state tax revenues were $3.9 million more than the estimates.

Sales taxes were $33.5 million more than the estimate for May and were 6.49% more than May 2015. May receipts reflect retail business activity that occurred in April. For ten months, revenues are $345.0 million higher than estimated. The year-to-date growth rate for ten months was 7.81%.

Year-to-date revenues for ten months were $798.4 million more than the budgeted estimate. The general fund recorded $735.8 million above budgeted estimates and the four other funds were $62.6 million more than the budgeted estimate.

The budgeted revenue estimates for 2015-2016 are based on the State Funding Board’s consensus recommendation of December 16th, 2014 and adopted by the first session of the 109th General Assembly in April 2015. Also incorporated in the estimates are any changes in revenue enacted during the 2015 session of the General Assembly. These estimates are available on the state’s website at http://www.tn.gov/finance/article/fa-budget-rev.

On April 14, 2016, in the second session of the 109th General Assembly, the legislature passed the 2016-2017 budget, which included the Funding Board’s current year revised ranges. The governor signed the appropriations bill on April 21, 2016.

With passage of the appropriations act, Public Chapter 758, the General Assembly recognized an additional $376.1 million in total tax revenue and a corresponding increase in general fund revenues in an amount of $355.0 million for the current fiscal year.

 
State Fire Marshal’s Office Urges Safety with Outdoor Grilling

Tennessee Grilling Fires Resulted in Eight Injuries and $6.2 Million in Property Damage

 

NASHVILLE – While summer is the perfect time to gather with family and friends for a BBQ, the State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) warns that it is also the peak season for outdoor grilling fires. The SFMO reminds outdoor cooks to make fire safety a priority as they start up the grill this summer.

From 2011-2015, Tennessee fire departments responded to 206 fires involving grills, hibachis or barbeques. Those fires resulted in four civilian injuries, four firefighter injuries and $6.2 million in property damage, according to the Tennessee Fire Incident Reporting System (TFIRS).

Here are some additional tips to make your summer cookouts memorable for the right reasons:

General Grilling Tips

  • Do not wear loose clothing while cooking at a grill.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area.
  • Never grill/barbecue in enclosed areas - carbon monoxide could be produced. Propane and charcoal grills should only be used outdoors.

Propane Grills

  • Before using a gas grill, check the connection between the propane tank and the fuel line. Make sure the venturi tubes - where the air and gas mix - are not blocked.
  • Check grill hoses for cracking, brittleness, holes, and leaks. To check for leaks: Turn the propane tank on. Apply a light soap and water solution to the hose using a brush or spray bottle. If there is a gas leak, the propane will release bubbles around the hose (big enough to see).
  • If you smell gas while cooking, move away from the grill and call the fire department immediately. Do not move the grill.
  • Do not overfill the propane tank.
  • Always make sure your gas grill lid is open before lighting it.
  • If the flame goes out, turn the grill and gas off and wait at least five minutes before re-lighting it.

Charcoal Grills

  • Be careful when using lighter fluid. Do not add fluid to an already lit fire because the flame can flashback up into the container and explode.
  • Keep all matches, lighters, and lighter fluid away from children. Teach your children to report any loose matches or lighters to an adult immediately.
  • Dispose of hot coals properly - douse them with plenty of water, and stir them to ensure that the fire is out. Never place them in plastic, paper or wooden containers.
 
«StartPrev12NextEnd»

Page 1 of 2