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Staffing Solutions of Lewisburg



 

 

Lyons-Chevrolet, First Commerce Bank, Blalock Plumbing and Electric, Ok Tire and Brake, Saddle Creek Golf Club

MCCOC

DECEMBER 2014 COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT RATES

NASHVILLE – County unemployment rates for December 2014, released Thursday, show the rate decreased in 20 counties, increased in 64 counties, and remained the same in 11 counties. Specific county information for December is available on the Internet; enter http://www.tn.gov/labor-wfd/labor_figures/LaborDEC2014.pdf.

Marshall County Unemployment rate dropped 1% from December 2013 to December 2014 to a rate of 7.4%.  Highest rate was recorded in Scott County with a rate of 13.1% and the lowest was recorded in Lincoln County with the rate of 4.4% Unemployment.

 
Arrest Made In Multiple Burglaries In Marshall County

On January 17th, 2015, the Co-Op located at 615 South Ellington Parkway was found to have been burglarized. Someone forced entry into the building and stole tools and money. Detective James Johnson was assigned as the lead investigator.

Detective Johnson worked with Detective Nichols of the Marshall County Sheriff’s Department to investigate a tip which subsequently lead to the recovery of a set of tools from a residence on Ostella Road in Cornersville, TN. The tools were positively identified as tools that had been reported stolen from Co-Op. The residence is home to Edward Webster. Edward Webster was identified as a person of interest in the case. Webster was previously convicted of committing 16 separate counts of burglary and vandalism to several factories in Lewisburg in 2012 and he is currently on parole.

On January 20th detectives requested the assistance of Probation and Parole Officers Crystal Gray and James King from the Tennessee Department of Corrections. James King is Webster’s parole officer. Gray and King conducted a search of Webster’s vehicle. During their search they located items which linked Webster to the burglary of the Co-Op. They also located handgun ammunition and a photo of Webster shooting a handgun. The photo was dated January 14th, 2015. As a convicted felon Webster is prohibited from possessing firearms.

Detectives and Parole and Probation Officers returned to the residence on Ostella Road and there they located a loaded .380 handgun, two swords, and several hundred rounds of ammunition of various calibers. They also found a saw and a paramedic jump bag containing medical supplies. These items were identified as belonging to the Five Points Fire Department which had been burglarized approximately one month earlier.

As a result of this investigation, warrants were obtained for the arrest of Edward Webster for Burglary, Theft Over $1000, and Vandalism Over $1000 for the burglary of the Co-Op.

Before Webster could be located by law enforcement several burglaries were reported in the Industrial Park. Metro Door, BDS Machine Shop, and Industrial Steel Supply were burglarized on January 23rd. On January 28th Southern Carton and Ace Bayou were burglarized. Edward Webster was identified by detectives as the suspect in these burglaries.

On January 28th Lewisburg City and Marshall County Sheriff’s Detectives conducted a surveillance operation on a residence in Lewisburg. They positively identified Webster and the truck which he had traded for the previous day. When Webster attempted to leave the residence detectives followed. Webster refused to stop and led detectives, Tennessee Highway Patrol, and Marshall County Sheriff’s Deputies on a chase through Marshall County. Webster was finally stopped by Marshall County Sheriff’s Deputies on Ebenezer Hollow Road. There he was taken into custody.

Webster was transported to the Marshall County Jail where he has been charged with multiple felonies including the additional burglaries, thefts, vandalisms, evading arrest, driving on a revoked driver’s license, and a parole violation. Webster has also been charged with the burglary, vandalism, and theft from Hawk Converting that occurred on November 30th, 2014. Webster's bond totals more than $600,000 with no bond issued on the parole violation.

Lewisburg Police Detectives asks that anyone with information that may be related to these or any other crimes to please contact the Lewisburg Police Department Criminal Investigation Division at (931) 359-3800 or Crime Stoppers at (931) 359-4867.

EDWARD FAYTE WEBSTER (White Male, 5’7”, 150lbs, Brown Hair, Blue Eyes, 21 yoa)

January 28th, 2015: Arrest made in multiple burglaries

On January 17th, 2015, the Co-Op located at 615 South Ellington Parkway was found to have been burglarized. Someone forced entry into the building and stole tools and money. Detective James Johnson was assigned as the lead investigator.

Detective Johnson worked with Detective Nichols of the Marshall County Sheriff’s Department to investigate a tip which subsequently lead to the recovery of a set of tools from a residence on Ostella Road in Cornersville, TN. The tools were positively identified as tools that had been reported stolen from Co-Op. The residence is home to Edward Webster. Edward Webster was identified as a person of interest in the case. Webster was previously convicted of committing 16 separate counts of burglary and vandalism to several factories in Lewisburg in 2012 and he is currently on parole.

On January 20th detectives requested the assistance of Probation and Parole Officers Crystal Gray and James King from the Tennessee Department of Corrections. James King is Webster’s parole officer. Gray and King conducted a search of Webster’s vehicle. During their search they located items which linked Webster to the burglary of the Co-Op. They also located handgun ammunition and a photo of Webster shooting a handgun. The photo was dated January 14th, 2015. As a convicted felon Webster is prohibited from possessing firearms.

Detectives and Parole and Probation Officers returned to the residence on Ostella Road and there they located a loaded .380 handgun, two swords, and several hundred rounds of ammunition of various calibers. They also found a saw and a paramedic jump bag containing medical supplies. These items were identified as belonging to the Five Points Fire Department which had been burglarized approximately one month earlier.

As a result of this investigation, warrants were obtained for the arrest of Edward Webster for Burglary, Theft Over $1000, and Vandalism Over $1000 for the burglary of the Co-Op.

Before Webster could be located by law enforcement several burglaries were reported in the Industrial Park. Metro Door, BDS Machine Shop, and Industrial Steel Supply were burglarized on January 23rd. On January 28th Southern Carton and Ace Bayou were burglarized. Edward Webster was identified by detectives as the suspect in these burglaries.

On January 28th Lewisburg City and Marshall County Sheriff’s Detectives conducted a surveillance operation on a residence in Lewisburg. They positively identified Webster and the truck which he had traded for the previous day. When Webster attempted to leave the residence detectives followed. Webster refused to stop and led detectives, Tennessee Highway Patrol, and Marshall County Sheriff’s Deputies on a chase through Marshall County. Webster was finally stopped by Marshall County Sheriff’s Deputies on Ebenezer Hollow Road. There he was taken into custody.

Webster was transported to the Marshall County Jail where he has been charged with multiple felonies including the additional burglaries, thefts, vandalisms, evading arrest, driving on a revoked driver’s license, and a parole violation. Webster has also been charged with the burglary, vandalism, and theft from Hawk Converting that occurred on November 30th, 2014. Webster's bond totals more than $600,000 with no bond issued on the parole violation.

Lewisburg Police Detectives asks that anyone with information that may be related to these or any other crimes to please contact the Lewisburg Police Department Criminal Investigation Division at (931) 359-3800 or Crime Stoppers at (931) 359-4867.

 

 

 
PINK OUT EVENTS

Please Join the Bulldogs and the Forrest Rockets for the "Pink Out" Monday, February 2nd at the Cornersville Gym. Both sides are asked to wear pink to support those fighting and survivors of Beast Cancer. See Ya There!

The MCHS Basketball Booster Club is selling pink t-shirts for the pink out game on Tuesday, February 3rd. They are asking the fans to come in pink shirts. All proceeds for the sell will go to the American Cancer Society from the Basketball teams. Anyone wanting a shirt call 931-703-3413. Cost is $10 and they can be picked up at the Monday the 2nd or Tuesday the 3rd at the home game. Pink out night is Tuesday, February 3rd.

 
PUBLIC ADVISORY FOR UNDECLARED ALLERGEN

NASHVILLE—The Tennessee Department of Agriculture is issuing a public advisory for an undeclared peanut allergen in 5 oz. containers of Pride of Szeged Hungarian Spice paprika, distributed by Spice Co. of Avenel, N.J. 

On Jan. 12, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture conducted routine retail food product sampling in the Cleveland, Tenn. area. The department’s test results for one product—5 oz. containers of Pride of Szeged Hungarian Spice paprika, no. 091617PAHU05PS —showed positive for the presence of a peanut allergen not disclosed on the product label.


The department reported these findings to the Federal Drug Administration and the distributor, Spice Co.

Spice Co. indicated that it will initiate a voluntary recall through the FDA, but to date has not provided the department with a distribution list of Tennessee retailers. 

If the product is found in additional Tennessee stores, the department will embargo this product and lot number as adulterated and/or misbranded pursuant to the Tennessee Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

 

As a precaution, the department is alerting consumers with peanut allergies as to the possible presence of peanut allergens in this product.  The department is requesting that retail locations remove this product from their shelves and contact the distributor. Additional recall instructions will be announced.

 
Maury Regional Promotes Heart Disease Awareness

COLUMBIA, TN – February 6 marks the 12-year anniversary of National Go Red Day and Maury Regional Medical Center (MRMC) is asking the community to wear red to increase awareness about heart disease. Heart disease remains the number one killer of both men and women, accounting for one out of every four deaths in America.

 

Heart disease refers to different types of heart conditions related to a process known as altherosclerosis, a condition that develops when cholesterol deposits (plaque) collect in arteries that supply blood to the heart.  Atherosclerosis causes the arteries to narrow, making it more difficult for blood to flow to the heart. The result is all too frequently a heart attack or stroke.

 

There are things that we can do to decrease our risk for heart disease. Maintaining a healthy weight by eating healthy meals, including foods low in saturated fat and cholesterol and high in fiber, can help prevent high cholesterol. Limiting salt in your diet can lower blood pressure and physical activity can also help maintain good heart health. The surgeon general recommends that adults engage in moderate-intensity exercise for at least 30 minutes three to five days per week.

 

MRMC encourages everyone to take this opportunity to learn more about healthy heart practices and what to do if you or a loved one shows any of the signs and symptoms of a heart attack. A quick response can prevent permanent heart damage and could save a life. Commonly, signs of a heart attack may include one or more of the following:

 

  • Chest discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back, which can feel like an uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, burning or pain
  • Discomfort in other parts of the upper body, in one or both arms, or in the neck, jaw, upper back or stomach
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort
  • Unusual fatigue
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or light-headedness

 

If you experience any of these symptoms or notice them in another person, you should immediately call 911. Emergency response personnel may begin treatment in the ambulance and will contact the emergency department so that physicians are ready and waiting for a patient as he or she arrives.

 

MRMC is dedicated to the prevention and treatment of heart disease. MRMC offers the latest technology in diagnostics, interventional procedures that include balloon angioplasty and stenting, and electrophysiology procedures that include implantable pacemakers and defibrillators. These services are complemented by a cardiac rehabilitation program that assists heart patients on the road to recovery. For more information, call 931.380.4012.

 
Structure Fire at Lewisburg Jewelry

According to a representative at the Marshall County EMA office, a passenger vehicle drove through the Lewisburg Jewelry building located on East Commerce Street in Lewisburg in the morning hours of Monday. The building caught on fire as a result of the crash. The car was driven by 82 year old, Emily Whitesell.

The driver accidently put the car in drive instead of reverse and ran into the building. The fire was put out and no injuries were reported.

 
Tennessee Unemployment Rate for December decreased to 6.6%

Tennessee labor & workforce development Commissioner Burns Phillips announced the TN preliminary unemployment rate for December was 6.6%, two-tenths of one percentage point lower that the November revised rate of 6.8%. the U.S. preliminary rate for December was 5.6%, also falling two-tenths of one percentage point from the prior month.

 
Marshall Medical Center Athletic Trainer Recognized With Award

LEWISBURG, Tenn. — Gregg Cloutier, a certified athletic trainer at Marshall Medical Center (MMC), has been recognized by the Tennessee Athletic Trainers Society. Cloutier received the Joe Worden Clinic/Professional Athletic Trainer of the Year Award during the organization’s annual meeting on January 18.

 

Cloutier has been employed at MMC since 2007 and currently works with student athletes at Marshall County High School through the MMC Physical Therapy Department.

 

The Joe Worden award is named for a former head athletic trainer at Vanderbilt University and is presented to those who best exemplify the qualities of compassion and professionalism in athletic training. Joe Worden, former head athletic trainer at Vanderbilt University has been described as the consummate athletic trainer. His regard for each athlete in his care provided a level of compassion and professionalism that was demonstrated both on and off the field. This award is given to that individual who best exemplifies the qualities that Joe Worden demonstrated in his illustrious and unselfish career Joe Worden, former head athletic trainer at Vanderbilt University has been described as the consummate athletic trainer. His regard for each athlete in his care provided a level of compassion and professionalism that was demonstrated both on and off the field. This award is given to that individual who best exemplifies the qualities that Joe Worden demonstrated in his illustrious and unselfish career

 
Blood Assurance Offers Scholarships to High School Seniors

Blood Assurance is now accepting applications for the Crystal Green Memorial Scholarship Program.  High school seniors enrolled in schools that host Blood Assurance blood drives through the Project Lifesaver (formerly Project Lifeline) program will be eligible to apply. Students must have a “B” average or better and at least a 20 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. More eligibility requirements can be found online at www.BloodAssurance.org.  The Crystal Green Memorial Scholarship Program currently provides twelve one-time scholarships of $1,500 each.

 

Crystal Green was diagnosed with aplastic anemia, and throughout her life she had to have numerous platelet transfusions. She underwent a bone marrow transplant to help her body fight the anemia. However, in November 1998 Crystal lost her battle, shortly after turning 21 years old. The following year her family established the scholarship in her memory through Blood Assurance.

 

Since its inception, 166 Crystal Green Memorial Scholarships have been awarded to students throughout Blood Assurance’s service area. Scholarships are paid directly to the student’s college or university of choice.

 

Applications are available online at www.BloodAssurance.org. For more information contact Bonnie Phillips at Blood Assurance 800-962-0628 ext. 1134 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Applications may also be available from high school guidance counselors. All applications must be uploaded, postmarked or received by Monday, March 31, 2015 to be considered.

 
Stay Warm This Winter With The Right Firewood

NASHVILLE– Burning firewood is a good option to keep your home warm through the winter months. The Tennessee Department of Agriculture advises consumers to consider the type of wood, its origin and quantity before making that purchase.

 

Wood varieties burn differently and produce differing amounts of heat. For example, oak burns more slowly and produces less smoke compared to pine. Determine the type of wood that will best serve your needs.

 

Ask retailers about the seasoning of the wood. Seasoning is the process by which wood is dried and typically takes nine months. Firewood that has not been properly seasoned will produce less heat, may burn poorly and create unnecessary soot and smoke.  Soot buildup over time in chimney flues can create a fire hazard, so inspect your chimney at least once a year to be safe.

 

Consider the origin of the wood. Wood from other states may transport invasive insects into Tennessee. Likewise, wood from some regions of the state may already be infested, and moving that wood can allow the damaging insect or disease populations to spread. Consumers can help avoid potential problems by purchasing firewood that was harvested near where it will be burned.

 

“The Emerald Ash Borer and Thousand Cankers Disease are two examples of invasives that have devastated many native hardwood trees in the U.S. as a result of the transportation of infested wood products,” Jeter said. “We continue to survey for both EAB and TCD since their discovery in Tennessee. We want to encourage all consumers to help slow the spread of invasive insects and diseases that affect the health of our forests.  Simply put, obey firewood quarantines and buy where you will burn.”

The last factor to consider when buying firewood is the quantity. Firewood has its own unit of measurement called a cord. Firewood must be sold by the cord or fractions starting at 1/8 of a cord. A cord of wood by law must equal 128 cubic feet. Be wary of terms such as face cord, rack, rick, tier, pile or truck-load, as these terms are not standardized in the sale of firewood. A typical pick-up truck cannot hold a cord of firewood.

 
State Fire Marshal: Manufactured Housing Fires Among Deadliest in Tennessee

 

NASHVILLE – Manufactured houses are the scenes of relatively few fires every year in Tennessee, but those fires are among the deadliest, causing a disproportionate number of fire-related deaths.

 

Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office officials are urging residents of manufactured homes – also known as mobile homes or trailers – to practice fire safety all year round. Currently, Tennessee has more than 250,000 manufactured homes.

 

According to the Tennessee Fire Incident Reporting System (TFIRS ), fire departments responded to 1,969 fires in manufactured homes during 2009-2013. Those fires killed 64, injured 71 civilians and caused $32.9 million in direct property damage. While manufactured housing accounted for only 5.25 percent of all total structure fires during that period, fires in manufactured housing caused 14.58 percent of all structure fire deaths.

 

“Fires move quicker in smaller spaces, leaving occupants with less time to escape. This is why it is crucial to have working smoke alarms installed in all homes,” said Tennessee Commerce and Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak. “Be prepared and have a plan of escape. And make sure you have working smoke alarms in your home.”

 

If you’re buying or renting a manufactured home, make sure you keep fire safety in mind. By following a few tips and knowing the facts and safety requirements for manufactured homes, you can help keep your family safe.

 

Safety Tips

  • Choose a manufactured home built after June 15, 1976, that has the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) label certifying that the home meets the minimum safety standards.
  • Keep gasoline, charcoal lighter and other flammable liquids locked in an outdoor shed. Never store items under your manufactured home. Store firewood away from the home.
  • Install skirting material to keep leaves and other debris and combustible items from blowing under your manufactured home where it could easily catch fire and spread into the home.
  • Be sure your manufactured home has enough smoke alarms. If your home does not have smoke alarms in or near every sleeping room and in or near the family/living area(s), immediately install new alarms and fresh batteries to protect these rooms.
  • For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Have a home fire escape plan that includes two ways out of every room and an outside meeting place. Make sure all ways out of the home are cleared of clutter and easy to use. Practice your fire escape plan with every member of the household at least twice a year.
  • If smoke alarms sound often when cooking, consider moving the alarm further from the kitchen area or install a photoelectric type alarm which is less sensitive to cooking.
  • If your smoke alarm is older than 10 years, replace it, as its lifespan has been exceeded.
  • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • Consider having a licensed electrician inspect the electrical system in your manufactured home to be sure it is safe and meets applicable National Electrical Code® requirements.
  • Never add too many plugs to outlets, extension cords or electrical circuits. If the circuit breaker trips or fuses blow, call a licensed electrician to check your system.
  • Have smokers smoke outside the home. Provide large, non-tip ashtrays and empty them frequently. Douse butts with water before throwing them away.
  • Do not smoke in bed or in a chair in which you are prone to fall asleep.
  • Keep space heaters and candles at least three feet away from anything that can burn. Turn off portable space heaters and blow out candles before falling asleep or when leaving a room.
  • When considering a new manufactured home, ask if residential sprinklers are available as an option.

 

For additional information on manufactured homes, contact the Tennessee Housing Association at 615-256-4733.

 
Portable Heater Safety Is Crucial During Winter's Coldest Months

The expected arrival of single-digit weather in Tennessee this week is prompting the State Fire Marshal’s Office to remind residents to stay safe when using portable heaters to stay warm.

 

Portable heaters are common sights during winter, but they can sometimes lead to tragedy. An estimated 900 portable heater fires in homes are reported to U.S. fire departments each year, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. In Tennessee, 3,194 heating fires occurred in Tennessee from 2009-2013, claiming the lives of 39 people, injuring 49 and damaging an estimated $32.7 million in property, according to figures from the Tennessee Fire Incident Reporting System (TFIRS).

 

Space heaters were involved in 59 percent of all of Tennessee’s heating fire deaths while 56 percent of all heating fires happened in just three months of the year – December, January, and February.

Following a few fire safety steps can prevent tragedy this winter:

• Turn heaters off when you go to bed or leave a room.

• Keep anything that can burn – including bedding, clothing, curtains, pets and people –at least three feet away from portable heaters.

• Only use portable heaters from a recognized testing laboratory and with an automatic shut-off so that if they tip over, they will shut off.

• Plug portable heaters directly into outlets and never into an extension cord or power strip.

• Check the cord for fraying, cracking and look for broken wires or signs of overheating in the device itself.

• Never run the heater cord (or any cord) under rugs or carpeting.

 

For the best protection from fire, use working smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside every sleeping area and in every bedroom, and interconnect them if possible. Test smoke alarms monthly and entirely replace any smoke alarm that is 10 years old or older. Develop and practice a home fire escape plan with every member of your household. Have two ways out of every room and a designated outside meeting place to gather in the event of an emergency.

 

 
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